Ghost Towns

Part of Nevada’s indelible charm and appeal is its rich heritage. And while time travel eludes us still, there is a way to step back into the Silver State’s astonishing past. Dotting the vast landscape of Nevada are countless ghost towns, and while some are marked only by indecipherable ruins and tumbleweeds, others are surprisingly intact. Either way, these remarkable places are portals into a Nevada of old and certainly worth a wander.

Nevada Adventures

A Romp Through The Olden Days In McGill

Uncovering A Little History In An Attempt To Prolong Vacation, Any Time In McGill Proves To Be An Afternoon Well Spent 

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A Haunting On The Comstock

Nevada Magazine's Eric Cachinero Tries His Hand at Ghostbusting In Some of Northern Nevada's Most Haunted Places 

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Discover & Do

Gabbs, NV

While most ghost towns in the West are left to the wear and tear of weather and time, Berlin is preserved by the State of Nevada

Dilapidated buildings in downtown Belmont
Belmont, NV

Like many historic cities in the Silver State, the grand, bustling city of Belmont has dwindled into one of the state’s more iconic ghost towns. Positioned north of Tonopah, and the additional living ghost town of Manhattan, lies the fascinating remains of Belmont. 

Gold Point, NV

A mining town that had its beginning in 1868, Gold Point thrived until the 1960s, when an accident shuttered the industry. Today, less than 30 residents welcome visitors to tour the town.

Wells, NV

Spectacular views from any location along the Spruce Mountain ridge, just east of Clover Valley. Climb through the white fir forest and mountain mahogany, explore the remnants of old mining towns and experience plenty of memorable riding.

Moapa Valley, NV

You need to use your imagination when you visit St. Thomas, the now vanished farming and railroad town built at the confluence of the Muddy and Virgin Rivers in southern Nevada. Mormon settlers founded St. Thomas in 1865, but they returned to Utah in the early 1870s when a state boundary survey placed the town in Nevada. After 1880, several Utah farmers came back to St. Thomas and the town slowly regrew.